Posted by & filed under Dental Emergency, General Dentistry, Prevention.

children at schoolNobody wants to get that call from their child’s school saying that there was an accident on the playground or during gym class. But as parents, we all know that sometimes accidents happen, and sometimes those accidents happen at school. But what do you do if your kid has a dental emergency? Our pediatric dental office in Long Island is here to help.

Best Things to do During a Dental Emergency

  • Call your Long Island pediatric dentist. Most dental offices block off appointments that can be used to treat dental emergencies, so try calling your child’s dentist first. Chances are they’ll do everything they can to see your child sooner rather than later. Even if there is no appointment available, the dental team may also be able to give you advice on how to minimize any pain and will schedule you an appointment as soon as possible   
  • Consider going to the emergency room. It’s important to note that not every dental emergency requires a trip to the emergency room. However, if the injury also involved the head or if there’s any risk of head trauma, go to the nearest emergency room.
  • Stay calm – for your sake and your child’s. Try your best to talk with your child using a soft and gentle tone. This helps both relax you and your child.
  • If there’s blood, don’t panic. This tip may be easier said than done, but don’t be too alarmed if there seems to be a lot of blood. Injuries to the head, face, and mouth tend to bleed more than other areas of the body. Control bleeding by using a clean compress to cover the area and apply light pressure. This should slow or stop the bleeding pretty quickly. If the bleeding still continues after fifteen or so minutes, go to the emergency room.
  • Don’t touch tooth roots. If the dental injury involves a tooth that’s been knocked out, don’t touch the roots of the tooth or wash it off with water. The best thing to do with a knocked out tooth is to either gently place it back into the socket, hold it under the tongue, or place it in a glass of milk. These are short-term solutions and you should visit the dentist immediately.
  • Avoid putting aspirin on gums. Some articles online claim that putting a crushed up aspirin on the gums can help relieve a toothache. However, this can actually do more harm than good as aspirin applied directly to the gums can result in tissue damage. Have your child take medication as directed and use a cold compress to ease any pain.

If your child experiences a dental emergency or if you have questions, we welcome you to call our Long Island pediatric dental office. We’re here to help!